Saturday, July 10, 2010

LNRIs: Two Cases, One Result

Nearly everyone's found themselves awake at ridiculous hours reading a book at some point in their life. But what leads up to this nearly universal situation? Based on scientific study, I've determined that there are two specific cases resulting in these Late Night Reading Incidents (LNRIs). For your benefit, I've broken down these two cases, and assessed them on their practicality, necessity, consequences, and worth-it-ness

CASE 1: You're reading a book for fun, and find yourself totally engrossed. No matter what you do, you just can't put the book down. You don't want to do anything until you find out how the story ends. As a result, you don't let yourself sleep until you've finished the book, which you usually don't do until 2:00 AM - 3:00 AM.
PRACTICALITY - LOW
NECESSITY - NONE
CONSEQUENCES - NEXT-DAY EXCITEMENT ABOUT YOUR BOOK'S RESOLUTION
WORTH IT? - ALWAYS
CASE 2: You have to take notes on/will be tested on the contents of a book. Either through the accumulation of other work or through your own procrastination, you find yourself unable to begin your note-taking/reading until 10:00 PM - 12:00 PM. A massive LNRI ensues.
PRACTICALITY - STILL PRETTY LOW, BUT HIGHER THAN CASE ONE
NECESSITY - HIGH
CONSEQUENCES - NEXT-DAY FATIGUE, POSSIBLE MASTERY OF BOOK'S MATERIAL (THOUGH USUALLY NOT)
WORTH IT? - USUALLY NOT
I'm pretty sure these are the two primary (if not the only two) causes of LNRIs. Have I missed one? Let me know.

1 comment:

  1. What about when you're reading something totally dull and you fall half asleep only to wake up in the middle of the night? This has happened to me both with necessary (Number the Stars, for example), and non-necessary (anything by Piers Anthony) books. This might be it's own category.

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